WNCW-FM Podcasts

Podcasts of visiting artists and local news stories.

Image of cover of magazine for Our State featuring a picture of the Blue Ridge Parkway
Andy Toms

The magazine dedicated to all the good things that make up the great state of North Carolina, returned to the airwaves of WNCW.  Our State Magazine, Editor in Chief- Elizabeth Hudson took part in this Friday Feature Interview of the Week to go over the mag edition called "Summer Mountain Getaway".  The interview first aired July 6, 2018.

Posted by Host and Producer of The Friday Feature, Paul Foster- WNCW Senior Producer, News and PSA Coordinator, and Morning Edition Regional Host

After a recent series of reports by the Charlotte Observer, it was learned that a record number of pedestrians have been killed on the streets of the Queen City.  What's being done to improve safety?  What are the main causes?  Is the driver of a vehicle or the walking pedestrian more to blame in this incidents?  Reporter Steve Harrison of the Observer spoke with WNCW (from July 4, 2018).

Posted by Host and Producer of WNCW's More To The Story, Paul Foster- Senior Producer, News and PSA Coordinator, and Morning Edition Regional Host

Friday Feature- The N.C. Music Hall of Fame

Jul 13, 2018
NC Music Hal of Fame Psoter
NC Music Hall Of Fame

Did you know that North Carolina had a music hall of fame?  It makes perfect sense, since our state has such a rich and long standing tradition of various music genres and artists.  Executive Director of the NC Music Hall of Fame, Veronica Cordle, tells the Friday Feature all about it.  The original on-air broadcast took place June 29, 2018.

Posted by Host and Producer of WNCW's Friday Feature Interview of the Week, Paul Foster- Senior Producer, News and PSA Coordinator, and Morning Edition Regional Host

Etta Baker picked up her ragtime influenced style of fingerpicking at the age of 3 from her father. She became a master of the Piedmont Blues, influencing musicians like Bob Dylan, Taj Mahal, and Kenny Wayne Shepherd.  Etta practiced her two-finger picking style an hour every day in addition to raising nine children with her musician husband. After raising nine children and working 26 years at a Morganton textile mill, she quit at age 60 to become a professional musician.

Today, the tradition of ballad singing is alive and well in the North Carolina mountains thanks in part to Sheila Kay Adams, a seventh generation singer.  Raised in the community of Sodom in Madison County, Adams learned from her great aunt Dellie Chandler Norton, sitting together and repeating the verses to each other knee-to-knee until the songs were “caught.”

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