This Old Porch™

Sundays from 3 to 6pm

This Old Porch is a show of traditional and regional mountain music, songs and ballads, contemporary old time, dance tunes and more. Folklorist John Fowler and award winning musician Carol Rifkin host this show that keeps the music of the mountains alive.

Thanks to Brooke Lauer from South Carolina, who designed the logo for This Old Porch.

Two men playing instruments and smiling
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Surry County’s Round Peak area, and the surrounding communities between Mount Airy, N.C., and Galax, Va., have shaped the sound of Old-Time music heard across the nation and around the world.  Two of the best-known members of this tradition were Tommy Jarrell and Fred Cockerham.

Host John Fowler welcomes Crescent Moon Rounders to This Old Porch on Sunday, February 4th at 3:30 for an interview and live session with songs from their new album Ain’t Gonna Get No Supper Here Tonight. The Crescent Moon Rounders have been performing together at musical festivals in North Carolina for over a dozen years. Reid Ringer, from Saluda, South Carolina, and Rob Morrison, from Chapel Hill, have played in various bands together for over 30 years. Ray Owens, from Charlotte, has come from a mixture of bands from Asheville to Charlotte before he joined the Rounders.

Two men playing instruments and smiling
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In the Blue Ridge, the Christmas season was celebrated for days on end, with gatherings of family and friends, good food, and lots of music. This was especially true in the area known as Round Peak, around Mount Airy, North Carolina, and Galax, Virginia. The tradition was called Breaking up Christmas, and December 25th was just the beginning.

Woman singing from book
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In 1821, Sequoyah singlehandedly created a syllabary, or writing system, for his people, the Cherokee Indians. Within a few years, the tribe’s literacy rate was far higher than their white neighbors. First published in 1829, the Cherokee Hymnbook contained the lyrics to sacred songs, written in Cherokee, using Sequoyah’s syllabary. It was a groundbreaking achievement, created for an audience who could both read the Cherokee language and sing by heart the tunes that went with the lyrics.

Children playing instruments
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In 2000, Helen White, a school guidance counselor, founded a music program in the Alleghany County, N.C, schools.  She called it Junior Appalachian Musicians—or JAM. The program offered instruction in the traditional music of the mountains. To say that JAM has been a success would be almost as big an understatement as saying that Bill Monroe had something to do with bluegrass.

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