This Old Porch™

Sundays from 3 to 6pm

This Old Porch is a show of traditional and regional mountain music, songs and ballads, contemporary old time, dance tunes and more. Folklorist John Fowler and award winning musician Carol Rifkin host this show that keeps the music of the mountains alive.

Thanks to Brooke Lauer from South Carolina, who designed the logo for This Old Porch.

(These CD's are available online or call 1-800-245-8870 during Fund Drive hours)

Alan Jabbour and Stephen Wade Americana Concert
Altan The Gap of Dreams
Doc Watson Live at Club 47
Press Gang Fortune It May Smile
(Various): The Crooked Road A Century of Heritage Guitar Music * $100 2-CD Set

Rev. Sparks & the Jubilee: An Appalachian roots old-time string band with Jake Blount, Mason Via, Clarke Williams, Landon George will join Carol live in the studio this Sunday, March 11 at 4:00pm during This Old Porch.

Host John Fowler welcomes Crescent Moon Rounders to This Old Porch on Sunday, February 4th at 3:30 for an interview and live session with songs from their new album Ain’t Gonna Get No Supper Here Tonight. The Crescent Moon Rounders have been performing together at musical festivals in North Carolina for over a dozen years. Reid Ringer, from Saluda, South Carolina, and Rob Morrison, from Chapel Hill, have played in various bands together for over 30 years. Ray Owens, from Charlotte, has come from a mixture of bands from Asheville to Charlotte before he joined the Rounders.

(The following thank-you CD's marked with "**" are in limited quantity and only available by calling 1-800-245-8870. All others are listed in our drop-down menu.)

Altan -- "The Gap of Dreams"

**The Press Gang -- "Fortune It May Smile"**

**Alan Jabbour and Stephen Wade -- "Americana Concert"**

Doc Watson -- "Live at Club 47"

**(Various Artists): "The Crooked Road: A Century of Heritage Guitar Music"**

Doc Watson’s signature baritone voice and unique lead bluegrass guitar licks became synonymous with traditional and bluegrass music. Born in Deep Gap, N.C., Doc lost his vision before his first birthday but never let his blindness slow him down, learning ballads and teaching himself harmonica, banjo and guitar. Since his death in 2012, Doc remains the most highly respected flat-pick guitar player in the history of traditional American music.

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