NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 7am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Editiondraws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Host(s): 
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Television
12:01 am
Mon February 13, 2012

I'm Just Sayin': There Are Anachronisms In 'Downton'

Listen Carefully: Some phrases have made it into Downton Abbey that are a little ahead of their time. Above, Mr. Carson (Jim Carter) tries out a newfangled gadget with Lady Mary (Michelle Dockery).
Courtesy Carnival Film & Television Limited/Masterpiece

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:51 am

PBS's hit series Downton Abbey has been praised for its subtle and witty dialogue. But a few anachronisms have slipped into the characters' conversations, and spotting them has become a hobby for many fans.

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Programming
6:00 pm
Sun February 12, 2012

Morning Edition: Special Feature for Monday, February 13th

"Barnheart", by Jenna Woginrich. WNCW reporter Stina Sieg interviews the author about her move from the urban environment to her quest for a place to become a homesteader, farmer, and a young woman who is self-sufficient. This is the laugh-out-loud funny and poignant memoir of her struggles and her triumphs at Cold Antler Farm in upstate New York.

Health Care
1:18 pm
Fri February 10, 2012

White House Offers 'Accommodation' On Contraception

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday morning, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Around the Nation
7:39 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Wisconsin Court Decides Who Gets The Cat

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Middle East
7:29 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Madonna Fan Would Be Irked By War With Iran

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. We have no evidence this is a mass movement, but at least one person seems to have a reason to urge Israel's prime minister to delay an attack on Iran. Israeli officials have been speculating out loud about a strike. Now a Facebook page is pushing for the war to wait, at least long enough to keep from disrupting a concert by Madonna in Tel Aviv. The page is called No War with Iran until After Madonna's Performance on May 29. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Economy
4:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Greece Waits For Bailout After Meeting EU Conditions

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Overall economic numbers for this year have been looking better, but almost every forecast for 2012 has included at least a mention that catastrophe could still come from Europe. The crisis over Greece's debt is not over, even after yesterday when lawmakers approved more budget cuts and economic reforms. Now Greek unions are protesting again.

Resolving this crisis has taken years, and there's a reason: a debt crisis has never really been solved this way before. Here's Zoe Chace of NPR's Planet Money team.

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Business
4:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Bank Settlement Could Temporarily Spur More Foreclosures

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

News of the foreclosure settlement spread in Washington, just as the Senate Banking Committee was holding a hearing on the housing market.

NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

CHRIS ARNOLD, BYLINE: Details were still emerging as the hearing began. And senators wanted to know would this deal do anything meaningful to help homeowners and the housing market.

SENATOR ROBERT MENENDEZ: Do you think the $25 billion state/federal foreclosure settlement is a good deal? Do you think that that's the right amount?

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Politics
4:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Obama To Release Fiscal 2013 Budget Next Week

President Obama will unveil his budget for the next fiscal year on Monday. To find out more about the budget proposal, Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel, economics editor at The Wall Street Journal.

Business
4:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Advocates Not Impressed With Foreclosure Settlement

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Here's a sign of just how huge the housing and foreclosure crisis has been. Five big banks agreed to pay about $25 billion to people who've been harmed bank's abuses, plus an extra billion to settle a claim involving a mortgage company. And one of the first reactions is that all that money could not possibly be enough.

President Obama says the banks will spread the money around.

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World
4:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Maldives President Says He Was Ousted In A Coup

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

To people who visit the idyllic tourist destination of the Maldives, politics can seem far away. But this week, the country's President Mohamed Nasheed stepped down after weeks of demonstrations. He was forced to resign by elements within the police and army. Here's how he described the situation to Al Jazeera.

(SOUNDBITE OF AL JAZEERA BROADCAST)

PRESIDENT MOHAMED NASHEED: This is a coup. It definitely is, if you find any definition of a coup anywhere. I did not want to defend. That is why there was no blood.

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