NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 7am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Editiondraws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Theater
4:00 am
Thu April 12, 2012

Philip Seymour Hoffman Is The New Willy Loman

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman is starring in a Broadway revival of Death of a Salesman. He talks to Steve Inskeep about the Arthur Miller play which premiered in 1949.

Movies
4:00 am
Thu April 12, 2012

'Harold And Kumar' Creators Recommend DVDs

Filmmakers Jon Hurwitz and Hayden Schlossberg talk to Steve Inskeep for the latest in our occasional series "Watch This." The creators of the Harold and Kumar franchise have directed the reboot of the American Pie franchise and give their picks for home entertainment.

Business
4:00 am
Thu April 12, 2012

Johnson & Johnson Ordered To Pay $1 Billion Fine

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a big fine for Johnson & Johnson.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: So much for no more tears. A judge in Arkansas ordered the company most famous for its baby shampoo to by more than a billion dollars in fines yesterday over its marketing for a very different product. That would be an antipsychotic drug, Risperdal.

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Programming
1:00 pm
Wed April 11, 2012

Morning Edition April 12th: YMCA of WNC Healthy Kids Day 2012

The YMCA of Western North Carolina will host Healthy Kids Day on Saturday, April 14th.  Morgan Neely and Virginia Maziarka of the Asheville YMCA will talk about this national day of fun for kids and parents to focus on healthy activities and healthier habits to make being healthy a natural part of everyday life for everyone. For details go to www.ymcawnc.org.

Around the Nation
7:43 am
Wed April 11, 2012

Clinton Enjoys 'Texts From Hillary' Web Spoof

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Texts from Hillary went viral last week. That spoof site imagines the Secretary of State's cool, detached texts to the famous, from Jay Z to Joe Biden. One shows Lady Gaga texting from one influential woman to another, XO. Clinton's response: Who is this? Yesterday, the site heard from the real Clinton, who texted that she was ROFL, rolling on the floor laughing, signed Hillz. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
6:17 am
Wed April 11, 2012

Strong Earthquake Strikes Off Indonesia's Coast

A huge earthquake shook the ocean floor off the coast of Indonesia Wednesday. Early measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey give it a strength of 8.7. Surrounding nations have issued tsunami warnings.

Business
4:00 am
Wed April 11, 2012

What Would The Buffett Rule Mean For The U.S. Economy

President Obama makes a case for the tax proposal dubbed the "Buffett rule" Tuesday at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Fla.
Marc Serota Getty Images

A tax-the-rich proposal named after Warren Buffett has little chance of passing this year, but that hasn't stopped the debate over what impact it would have.

Some economists are skeptical that a 30 percent minimum tax on people with million-dollar incomes — known as the "Buffett rule" — would do much to reduce the deficit or boost the economy. But the Obama administration says the proposal is necessary to make the tax code more equitable.

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Energy
4:00 am
Wed April 11, 2012

Natural Gas Glut Leads To Lower Prices

The U.S. is facing a growing surplus in natural gas. Renee Montagne talks to Amy Myers Jaffe, of the Energy Forum at the Baker Institute at Rice University, about the glut. She expects some consolidation in the industry.

Business
4:00 am
Wed April 11, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Officials in San Gabriel Valley set up a quarantine zone after a lemon tree was found infected with citrus disease. That disease almost wiped out Florida's citrus crop a few years back.

Business
4:00 am
Wed April 11, 2012

Wireless Industry Tries To Thwart Smartphone Thefts

The wireless phone industry has a plan to take the profit out of the market for stolen smartphones. At the urging of police chiefs across the country and federal regulators, the industry is developing a database of stolen devices.

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