NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 7am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Editiondraws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Business
8:25 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Microsoft Snaps Up Yammer For $1.2 Billion

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with some yammering.

Microsoft is buying the tech startup Yammer for $1.2 billion, thus proving that you can get a 10 figure sales prices for a company called Yammer. It's the company's attempt to get a social network in its portfolio. Now Yammer, if you're not familiar with it, is like Facebook, but for businesses. It allows employees to see what colleagues in the same company are doing - in case you can't learn that at the water cooler.

Around the Nation
7:32 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Dock Collapses Under Michigan Wedding Party

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:25 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Dozens Protest Mass. Town's Cursing Ban

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Business
7:15 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Orbitz Shows Mac Users More Expensive Options

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:25 am

Visitors to the online travel agency Orbitz see different results depending on what kind of computer they're using, according to The Wall Street Journal. Users of Apple computers are seeing more expensive options than those who search for hotels using a PC.

Food
5:31 am
Tue June 26, 2012

App Will Match Farmers With Meat Distributors

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And many people want to carve out a slice of the national meat market - that includes people who would like to sell you locally grown meat.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A company from Kansas City - now, there's a city that knows meat - is developing an application, or app, for smartphones. Nathan Jones wants to help local farmers find distributors.

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National Security
5:22 am
Tue June 26, 2012

100 Suspected Radicals May Be Part Of U.S. Military

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:44 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The U.S. military has taken a close look at itself and found evidence of threats within its ranks.

MONTAGNE: The Pentagon, along with the FBI, has conducted more than 100 investigations into possible Islamist extremists inside the military.

NPR has learned that about a dozen of those cases are considered serious.

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Law
4:58 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Justices Uphold Arizona's Show Me Your Papers Provision

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

News junkies yesterday had one of those classic moments involving the Supreme Court. The High Court ruled on Arizona's immigration law.

INSKEEP: And there was a period of frantic uncertainty as reporters and analysts tried to figure out what the ruling meant. Now it is clear the Court has given a mixed verdict to Arizona's law, casting doubt on copycat laws in other states.

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Law
4:58 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Ariz. Gov. Brewer Calls Supreme Court Ruling A Win

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's return, now, to the governor of Arizona, Jan Brewer. As we heard a moment ago, she's calling this a win, even though the Court struck down most of the Arizona law and said it would wait and see how the show me your papers provision is applied.

GOVERNOR JAN BREWER: Arizona's and every other state's inherent authority to protect and defend its people has been upheld.

INSKEEP: Governor Brewer is one of many Arizona voices responding to the ruling. Here's NPR's Ted Robbins.

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Law
4:58 am
Tue June 26, 2012

How Will Immigration Ruling Effect Other States?

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:59 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Alabama, a similar but tougher immigration law faces its own legal challenge. That case had been on hold, pending a ruling on the Arizona law. Andrew Yeager reports from member station WBHM.

ANDREW YEAGER, BYLINE: State Senator Scott Beason's phone has been ringing off the hook.

STATE SEN. SCOTT BEASON: Everybody calls and says, you know, have you read the opinion yet? And my answer is always no, because I've been on the phone constantly since. But no, I haven't...

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Around the Nation
4:58 am
Tue June 26, 2012

License Plate Readers Spark Privacy Concerns

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Chances are that your car's license plate has been photographed recently and downloaded into a data bank. The leading vendor of automated license plate readers says they're now used in nearly every state. Police say they fight crime, but there are privacy concerns about the new technology, as Charlotte Alright reports from Vermont Public Radio.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAR STARTING)

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