NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 7am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Editiondraws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Family Matters: The Money Squeeze
3:01 am
Tue June 5, 2012

Caring For Aging Relative: 'To Give Her A Good Life'

Geneva Hunter (left), who runs the secretarial operations for a Washington, D.C., law firm, decided to take a hands-on approach to her mother's care and moved Ida Christian, 89, into her Maryland home.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 8:32 pm

Part of the Family Matters series

Over the last two months, NPR's Morning Edition has been following three families who make up the growing number of multigenerational households in this country. All became multigenerational unexpectedly, when elderly relatives could no longer live independently and the families took them in.

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Africa
3:00 am
Tue June 5, 2012

Tunisian Women Turn Revolution Into Opportunity

Workers at a carpet-making business in the town of Kairouan are paid about $2.50 a day. Many carpet buyers are tourists, but the number of foreign visitors has dropped since the revolution.

John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:42 am

Over the next couple weeks, NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is taking a Revolutionary Road Trip across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves as they write new social rules, rebuild their economies and establish new political systems. Steve and his team will be traveling some 2,000 miles from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya and on to Egypt's megacity of Cairo. In this story, he looks at the changing role of women in the new Tunisia.

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programming
1:08 pm
Mon June 4, 2012

Morning Edition on Tuesday, June 5 at 8:50AM: MISS NC 1963 RAISES FUNDS FOR HAYWOOD COUNTY

Jeanne Robertson was crowned Miss North Carolina in 1963, and the 6-foot-2-inch humorist is proud to say that no one has milked the title more. For nearly 50 years, she has made her living telling true stories that really make people laugh. Recently, Stina Sieg spoke with Robertson, who will be featured at Stuart Auditorium at Lake Junaluska at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 9. The show is a fundraiser for the United Way of Haywood County and the Haywood Jackson Volunteer Center.  

 

Business
11:10 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Spain's Jobless Claims Fall For 2nd Month In A Row

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with some good news for Spain.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Around the Nation
7:16 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Would-Be Bank Robber Gets Stuck In Air Duct

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 11:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:10 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Fifth-Grader Skips School To See President Obama

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 1:27 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Africa
6:02 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Egyptians Unsatisfied With Mubarak Verdict

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 1:26 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Egypt, protests continue against the verdicts in the trial of former President Hosni Mubarak and various people in his old regime. Mubarak was handed a life sentence in connection to the deaths of protesters during last year's revolution. But critics say the judge's ruling all but ensured the former president's sentence will be overturned on appeal.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson has the story from Cairo.

JUDGE AHMED REFAAT: (Foreign language spoken)

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Europe
5:54 am
Mon June 4, 2012

River Pageant Pays Tribute To Queen's Jubilee

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 11:12 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Bad economic headlines have not stopped the celebration in Britain. Britons are in the midst of a four-day holiday celebrating Queen Elizabeth's 60 years on the throne. And yesterday the queen herself led a flotilla of a thousand boats on the Thames. It was described as the largest such river pageant in more than 300 years, and Vicki Barker was there.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Economy
5:26 am
Mon June 4, 2012

EU Officials Try Keep Eurozone From Going Down The Tubes

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 11:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We have just come from a week when officials of the European Union openly warned of the possible downfall of the euro. Billionaire investor George Soros has gone even further. He says the euro crisis could bring down the entire E.U. Teri Schultz reports from Brussels.

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Business
5:26 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Unemployment Followup

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 11:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

From jobseekers in Spain, we turn to those here in the U.S. The latest employment numbers revealed that there are still many more Americans looking for work than there are our jobs that need filling. The May jobs report showed the economy added an anemic 69,000 jobs - about half the number that were added in April. Yet, here's the paradox: Despite the high number of people seeking jobs, many employers insist they can't find the right person for the exact positions they have open.

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