NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 7am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Editiondraws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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The Salt
3:04 am
Tue June 26, 2012

The Making of Meat-Eating America

Men at a slaughterhouse stand near hanging beef carcasses, late 1940s.
Lass Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:44 pm

We eat a lot of meat in this country; per person, more than almost anywhere else on Earth. (Here's a helpful map of global meat-eating.)

But why? What makes an American eat ten or twelve times more meat than the average person in Mozambique or Bangladesh?

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Fine Art
3:02 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Reflective Art Brings Light, Color To Historic Spaces

Andy Cao and Xavier Perrot's Red Bowl installation in Beauvais, France, recalls the way lepers once bathed in animal blood in an effort to cure themselves and avoid being ostracized to the one-time leprosarium where the installation is located.
Courtesy of Cao | Perrot Studio

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 1:03 pm

This is a story about amazing beauty, imagination and magical effects — and it begins, ironically enough, at a one-time leprosarium, or hospital for lepers, in Beauvais, France, a small town outside Paris.

Lepers were sequestered in Beauvais in the 12th century. That history is now noted in an outdoor art installation made up of slim metal rods that curve up into the shape of a bowl. Each rod is tipped with a red, marble-sized glass ball.

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The Record
8:06 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Springsteen's American Dream, Beautiful And Bleak

Bruce Springsteen onstage during the Born in the USA tour in 1985.
Richard E. Aaron Redferns

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:39 pm

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Law
1:38 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Ala. Juvenile Murderers Law Ruled Unconstitutional

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Law
1:12 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Supreme Court Makes 3 Key Rulings

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

It's been a busy morning at the Supreme Court. Justices released several opinions, including a ruling on Arizona's controversial immigration law aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration. That law gave police broad powers to stop suspected illegal immigrants and demand their papers, but civil rights groups said it went too far and gave states too much authority over immigration policy.

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Programming
10:09 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Morning Edition 6/26: TOOLS TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN A SMALL BUSINESS

This week, Pam Bunch will focus on the small business sector by talking with and about people who have a dream to own their own businesses.  To do this, she decided to talk to individuals who sought help from the Small Business Center at Isothermal Community College.  Bunch also talks to the director of the SBC, who can talk about what people can expect when they come to the Small Business Center for help.  The first interview is with Chris Carroll, who lost his job in home construction when the economy took a downturn.  He decided to check into the

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Around the Nation
6:59 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ugly Mugly Crowned World's Ugliest Dog

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:54 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ohio Octogenarians Skydive For Charity

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. George H. W. Bush, the first president Bush, made news since leaving office by jumping out of airplanes. Marjorie Bryan says she'd like to join him sometime. She's 83, and on Saturday she parachuted from a plan over Lima, Ohio, as did 82-year-old Marianna Sherman. They raised money for the Blue Star Mothers, whose kids served in the military. They jumped with a retired sergeant who has accompanied the ex-president in midair. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
5:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Famed Tortoise Dies In Galapagos Islands

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And we have a bit of sad news from the Galapagos Islands. The giant tortoise known as Lonesome George, believed to be the last living member of its subspecies - has died. We reported on the tortoise in 2008 when Lonesome George mated with a female from a similar species. The hope was his subspecies would be carried on. But the eggs turned out to be infertile. By tortoise standards, Lonesome George died relatively young. He was believed to be about 100 years old. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Sports
5:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Worried By The Debt Crisis, Soccer Distracts Europe

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You know, if you're weighed down by worry, you find a distraction. That at least is what Europeans are doing amid their economic trouble. They've been turning to their favorite sport - soccer. This weekend saw the last two Euro 2012 quarterfinals. This is a huge competition viewed in Europe, as second only to the World Cup. NPR's Philip Reeves of course has been following the action. He's on the line from London.

Hi, Phil.

PHILIP REEVES, BYLINE: Hi.

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