NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 7am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Editiondraws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Solve This
4:29 am
Tue October 9, 2012

Romney's Jobs Plan Relies On His Tax Proposal

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney shakes hands during a rainy campaign rally Monday in Newport News, Va.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:25 am

As part of Solve This, NPR's series on major issues facing the country, we're examining the presidential candidate's approach to boosting employment. After looking at President Obama's strategy, it's time to examine the plan of GOP nominee Mitt Romney.

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Law
2:59 am
Tue October 9, 2012

Sandusky Could Receive Up To 373 Years In Prison

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, shown arriving at court during his trial in June, is expected back in court Tuesday for a sentencing hearing.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:25 am

Jerry Sandusky is expected back in a Bellefonte, Pa., courtroom Tuesday for a sentencing hearing. The former Penn State assistant football coach was convicted in June of sexually abusing 10 boys. Now young men, some of the victims will be given an opportunity to tell the court how the abuse affected their lives.

Sandusky has been in a county jail since the jury convicted him on 45 out of 48 counts, but after the hearing, he likely will be moved to a state prison.

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Author Interviews
2:33 am
Tue October 9, 2012

'Mr. Penumbra' Bridges The Digital Divide

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:25 am

Author Robin Sloan has spent time on both sides of the digital divide, both as a short-story writer and an employee at Twitter — where he described his job as "something to do with figuring out the future of media."

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Music Interviews
2:32 am
Tue October 9, 2012

Tift Merritt: A Singer With An Outsider's Heart

Tift Merritt's latest album is called Traveling Alone.
Parker Fitzgerald Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 3:59 pm

Singer-songwriter Tift Merritt has been compared to Joni Mitchell and Emmylou Harris. She also has received a Grammy nomination for Best Country Album. The kind of music she makes doesn't attract much commercial attention — and that seems to suit her just fine.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:31 am
Tue October 9, 2012

A Lively Mind: Your Brain On Jane Austen

Matt Langione, a subject in the study, reads Jane Austen's Mansfield Park. Results from the study suggest that blood flow in the brain differs during leisurely and critical reading activities.
L.A. Cicero Stanford University

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 10:35 am

At a recent academic conference, Michigan State University professor Natalie Phillips stole a glance around the room. A speaker was talking but the audience was fidgety. Some people were conferring among themselves, or reading notes. One person had dozed off.

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Around the Nation
5:20 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Pipe Labeled 'Kaboom' Causes City Hall Evacuation

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with news of the evacuation of Akron City Hall. Authorities found a suspicious pipe labeled with the word Kaboom. Turns out it was accidentally left behind by Natural Hunka Kaboom, who comes to watch city council meetings. The pipe was an extendable shower rod he used as a walking stick. Mr. Kaboom tells the Akron Beacon Journal he meant no harm and that his name really is Kaboom. He changed it legally to promote his pest control business. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Analysis
5:11 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Campaigns Make The Most Of Remaining Weeks

GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney gives a foreign policy speech Monday. Campaigning in Florida Sunday, he posed the question, "Where's American leadership?" And President Obama in L.A. poked fun at his own debate performance, and talked about falling unemployment numbers.

Around the Nation
5:01 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Thieves Steal Gorilla Wearing Sunglasses, Shorts

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Oregon residents are being asked to please contact police if they happen to see a 30-foot tall gorilla. He's wearing sunglasses and polka dot shorts, carrying a hot tub and may or may not be inflated. This giant gorilla stood for years on top of the Spas of Oregon store in Gladstone. John Harrison, the owner, is not sure how the thieves took down that gorilla, but he is offering a reward for the return of the animal he calls Marty. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Middle East
4:40 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Syria, Turkey Exchange Weekend Artillery Fire

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

More Syrian mortar fire struck inside Turkey today. That's the sixth consecutive day that Syrian artillery shells have exploded across the border. The Turkish military, once again, responded with artillery fire back into northern Syria. There is a growing international chorus of calls for restraint as this cross-border fires continues, amid fears that Turkey could be dragged into the Syrian conflict. NPR's Peter Kenyon is following the story from Istanbul.

Hi, Peter.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Morning, Steve.

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Business
4:23 am
Mon October 8, 2012

What's Going Wrong With China's Solar Industry?

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 4:35 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Which brings us to our next story. As Americans try again to heat up the solar industry, let's get an update on the competition. We reported last week on the West Coast solar power company that is trying to succeed where companies like Solyndra famously failed. American companies have struggled because they've been undermined by cheap imports from China. So it is meaningful to note that China's solar power industry is a mess.

We're going to talk about that with Beijing-based economist Patrick Chovanec. Welcome back to the program.

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