NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 7am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Editiondraws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Race
6:43 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Did Obama's Make Trayvon Martin Case More Divisive?

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 8:21 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates says he noticed something about one of this year's major news stories. When Trayvon Martin, a black teenager, was killed by a white man in Florida, there was widespread dismay. And then President Obama spoke.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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NPR Story
6:26 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Louisiana's Plaquemines Parish Flooded By Isaac's Rain

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 4:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's get one perspective on Hurricane Isaac from Billy Nungesser. He is president of Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. If you look at a map of Louisiana, you'll see Plaquemines, that finger of land sticking far out into the Gulf of Mexico, the farthest reach of the Mississippi River Delta. And he's on the line from there.

Mr. Nungesser, welcome to the program.

BILLY NUNGESSER: How are you today?

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NPR Story
6:26 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Chinese Blame Failed Infrastructure On Corruption

Eight bridges have collapsed around China since 2011. Here, government investigators examine a recently built entrance ramp that collapsed last week in the northeastern city of Harbin, killing three people. Local residents believe government corruption and substandard materials are to blame.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 4:04 am

When the Yangmingtan bridge opened in the northeastern Chinese city of Harbin in November, local officials hailed it as a grand achievement.

The bridge stretched more than nine miles and cost nearly $300 million. Construction was supposed to take three years, but workers finished in half that time.

"A lot of comrades didn't go home for more than a year, never took a holiday, never took off a weekend," Yang Qingwei, the party secretary of a bridge construction company, proudly told Heilongjiang provincial TV.

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NPR Story
6:26 am
Wed August 29, 2012

What's Next? China's Fast-Growing Economy Slows

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 5:29 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Not so long ago, the journalist James Fallows made a prediction about China. Many Americans worry about the power of a rising China, but Fallows argued that in the next few years Americans may have more to worry about from China's weakness.

China's economic boom has altered the world economy, but its growth is slowing down. And we're going to talk about that with Beijing-based economist Patrick Chovanec. He's on the line from Beijing.

Welcome to the program.

PATRICK CHOVANEC ECONOMIST: Good to be here.

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Sweetness And Light
3:19 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Just Say No: Doping Diminishes All Athletes

San Francisco Giants' Melky Cabrera fouls off a pitch. Cabrera was suspended Aug 15 for 50 games without pay after testing positive for high levels of testosterone.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 8:23 am

Certain forms of art are performed in private. The painter is alone when he paints, the writer likewise.

But the most pertinent aspect of the performing arts is that they are watched. Dance, music, drama and sport are most challenging — and most thrilling — precisely because they are real, before our eyes.

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The Salt
3:18 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Boomer Women Prove They Can Dine Out And Still Lose Weight

Older women on a diet don't need to stop eating out; they just may need to make wiser food choices to keep weight off.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:35 am

When women go on a diet, we tend to avoid our favorite restaurants because they are filled with temptations — bread, booze and desserts. But are we doomed to sit in our kitchens eating salad alone while everyone else is headed out on the town if we want to keep the weight off?

Take heart, ladies. A new study of women in their 50s and early 60s finds they could eat out and still succeed at long-term weight loss.

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Presidential Race
3:18 am
Wed August 29, 2012

The Risks And Rewards Of Romney's Faith Story

Mitt Romney rarely talks about his Mormon faith.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 4:04 am

Mitt Romney's speech to the Republican National Convention on Thursday will be his chance to tell his story to the world. Perhaps the most unique part of that story is his devout Mormon faith.

Romney comes from a prominent Mormon family. He's held important leadership positions in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. But he rarely talks about his faith. When he does, he seems uncomfortable.

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programming
9:33 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Morning Edition on Wednesday, August 29th: THE PAUL L. DUNBAR EDUCATION MUSEUM

Paul Laurance Dunbar Room of Remembrance Education Museum

The small community of Grahamtown is a community within a community - the traditional heart of the African American community in Rutherford County. Several world famous black Americans began their education in small black schools in the county from the end of the civil war to the end of segregation, not only in Rutherford County, but in thousands of small communities across the country.

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Strange News
9:32 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Hunt For Lion Outside London Called Off

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Monkey See
8:37 am
Tue August 28, 2012

YouTube Trends: Politics And Pop, Yes, But Education And Science, Too

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:32 am

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