NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 7am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Editiondraws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Business
5:09 am
Thu September 20, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 6:32 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with good news for Google.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The search giant is expected to be the top firm in online display advertising revenue this year, according to analysts at the industry news site eMarketer. If their prediction comes true - if - Google will unseat the reigning online ad champ Facebook, which would be a blow for Facebook, which only last year managed to beat back the previous top-earner, Yahoo.

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Middle East
3:35 am
Thu September 20, 2012

U.S., Libyan Versions Of Consulate Attack Diverge

The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was in flames during an attack on Sept. 11. There are competing narratives on whether the attack was premeditated.
Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 9:24 am

The attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya last week has led to dueling versions of what unfolded that night in Benghazi.

To hear the Obama administration tell it, the attack that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans was spontaneous — and staged by local extremists who saw an opportunity to hijack peaceful demonstrations against an offensive film.

The Libyans have a different view. They say it was a premeditated strike, launched by foreign fighters with ties to al-Qaida.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:33 am
Thu September 20, 2012

New Experimental Drug Offers Autism Hope

Andy Tranfaglia, 23, who has Fragile X syndrome, rides a horse with his mother, Katie Clapp.
Katie Clapp

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 10:10 am

An experimental drug that helps people who have Fragile X syndrome is raising hopes of a treatment for autism.

The drug, called arbaclofen, made people with Fragile X less likely to avoid social interactions, according to a study in Science Translational Medicine. Researchers suspect it might do the same for people with autism.

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Planet Money
3:32 am
Thu September 20, 2012

Insurance Companies Send Out Rebate Checks; Economists Get Nervous

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 5:41 pm

Nearly 13 million Americans have gotten, or will soon be getting, rebates from their health insurance companies. This is because of a provision in the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) that's supposed to force insurance companies to run better.

But while the idea of getting a check from your health insurance company may sound great, some economists worry this rule could actually make health insurance more expensive.

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Animals
7:17 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Dog Shoots French Hunter

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:11 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Good Samaritan's Car Averts Pedestrian Crash

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A flat tire could have been tragic for an Ohio man, but for a good Samaritan who stopped to help and whose own car was then struck by a drunk driver.

Gerald Gronowski told the Cleveland Plain Dealer that he and his son would surely have been hit as they stood on the shoulder. All the more miraculous, the stranger, Christopher Manacci, had rescued Gronowski eight years earlier, pulling out a hook embedded in his hand while he was fishing.

Asia
4:49 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Japan Shocked By China's Protests Over Territorial Dispute

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:36 am

The head of Japan's Foreign Trade Council says China has started to delay imports of Japanese products. It's a replay of the de facto trade sanctions China imposed two years ago during a similar flare-up of tensions. The most recent confrontation was sparked by Japan's purchase of disputed islands which China claims sovereignty over. In Japan, the response to the more than a week of anti-Japanese protests across China has been shock.

Election 2012
4:49 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Romney Campaign Should 'Embrace' Taped Comments

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:45 am

Erick Erickson editor of RedState.com says Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney needs to "own" the comments he made in a video released by the liberal publication Mother Jones. In the secretly taped video, Romney was speaking to donors and said President Obama's supporters are "dependent on the government" and "pay no income tax." Steve Inskeep talks to Erickson about his reactions to the video.

Business
4:49 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an adjustment to the oil supply.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Religion
4:49 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Text Reignites Debate: Did Jesus Have A Wife?

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 5:03 am

A Harvard researcher says a "new gospel" written on a fragment of papyrus shows some early Christians believed Jesus had a wife. The fragment — which scholars believe was written in the fourth century — is creating a sensation among New Testament experts.

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