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Weekdays, 7am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Editiondraws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Around the Nation
7:58 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Jogging Banned From Baskett Slough Wildlife Refuge

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Running can be good for you but apparently, is bad for animals. People who like to run through the Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge were stunned by a new sign. According to the Statesman Journal, the signs at a trailhead there say: No Dogs, Horseback Riding and No Jogging. Hiking is apparently fine. Wildlife officials warn that running people can stress out the animals, and might even interfere with their breeding.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Record
7:42 am
Mon April 22, 2013

The Ghostface Killah Rises Again

Adrian Younge (left) and Ghostface onstage at the Seattle stop of their tour last week.
Erich Donaldson

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 2:26 pm

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Music News
7:13 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Rap Genius Annotates Song Verses

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, lets meet a couple of guys who are big fans of Ghostface Killah.

MAHBOD MOGHADAM: The best Ghostface song, I think, is " Nutmeg." That's all of his...

GREENE: That's Mahbod Moghadam. He and his friend Tom Lehman co-founded a Web site called Rap Genius.

MOGHADAM: Tom is here looking up...

TOM LEHMAN: These are my favorite lines of Ghost. It's from "Buck 50," where he says: supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, docialiexpilisticfragicalsuper Wu-Tang Chamber. Cancun catch me in the a room eating grouper...

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Business
6:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now solar power has had its problems in recent decades. For years, solar panels were too expensive to compete. More recently, as we heard earlier in the business news, solar panels got so cheap that manufacturers ran into trouble. But solar energy had a signal achievement in March, and that is our last word in business today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Analysis
6:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Lawmakers Weigh In On Boston Bombing Case

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Members of Congress are already weighing in on how they think the Boston suspect should be questioned and tried. And some are also questioning whether the FBI is sufficiently vigilant against terrorists in the wake of last week.

Joining us as she does most Mondays is Cokie Roberts. Cokie, good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS: Hi, David.

GREENE: Well, there was quite a difference of opinion on the Sunday talk shows yesterday about whether Dzhokhar Tsarnaev should be tried in a military court or a civilian one.

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Shots - Health News
3:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Scammers Find Fertile Ground In Health Law

Confusion over the details of the new health care law is leaving many people vulnerable to con artists. Evelyne Lois Such, 86, was recently the target of an attempted scam.
Matt Nager for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

One recent morning, Evelyne Lois Such was sitting at her kitchen table in Denver when the phone rang. Such, who's 86, didn't recognize the phone number or the deep voice on the other end of the line.

"He asked, 'Are you a senior?' and I said yes, and he said, 'Well, we are sending out all new Medicare cards, and I want to make sure I have all your statistics just correct,' " Such recalls.

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Shots - Health News
3:26 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Young Adults With Autism Can Thrive In High-Tech Jobs

Amelia Schabel, 23, works with art director Andrew LaBounty at the nonPareil Institute in Plano, Texas.
Courtesy of nonPareil

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:07 pm

The job hunt is complicated enough for most high school and college graduates — and even tougher for the growing number of young people on the autism spectrum. Despite the obstacles that people with autism face trying to find work, there's a natural landing place: the tech industry.

Amelia Schabel graduated from high school five years ago. She had good grades and enrolled in community college. But it was too stressful. After less than a month she was back at home, doing nothing.

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Business
3:24 am
Mon April 22, 2013

This Building Is Supergreen. Will It Be Copied?

This Seattle building, a project by the Bullitt Foundation, is said to be the world's greenest office building. It uses a weather station to conserve energy, creates lighting via photovoltaic cells on the roof and features composting toilets.
Courtesy of John Stamets

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

One of the world's greenest office buildings formally open its doors Monday — Earth Day. It's a project of the environmentally progressive Bullitt Foundation. Its ambition is bold: to showcase an entirely self-sustaining office building hoping that others will create similar projects.

The first thing that strikes you about the new Bullitt Center is the windows. Walking up to the building in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood, six stories of floor-to-ceiling glass soars above you.

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The Salt
3:22 am
Mon April 22, 2013

How Coffee Brings The World Together

The best coffee comes from high altitudes with a warm climate like in Huehuetenango, Guatemala.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:51 pm

Coffee is more than a drink. For many of us — OK, for me — it's woven into the fabric of every day.

It also connects us to far corners of the globe.

For instance, every Friday, a truck pulls up to the warehouse of Counter Culture Coffee, a small roaster and coffee distributor in Durham, N.C., and unloads a bunch of heavy burlap sacks.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
3:20 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Want More Gender Equality At Work? Go To An Emerging Market

Petrobras state-owned oil company CEO Maria das Gracas Silva Foster makes a speech during the Women's Forum Brazil 2012 in Sao Paulo, Brazil last year.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:11 am

A White House report puts it bluntly: "Today, younger women are more likely to graduate from college than are men and are more likely to hold a graduate school degree."

For the past decade more American women than men have earned undergraduate and Master's degrees; and in the past three years, they've outpaced men at the doctoral level, too.

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