Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Sat January 17, 2015

Hollande: Anti-'Charlie' Protesters Don't Understand French Values

French President Francois Hollande gestures as he delivers a speech to foreign ambassadors during a ceremony to extend New Year wishes at the Elysee Palace in Paris on Friday.
Jacques Brinon AP

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 2:01 pm

French President Francois Hollande says people protesting the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo do not understand the French attachment to freedom of speech.

His statement comes amid protests over the publication's depiction of the Prophet Muhammad on its latest cover that went to press just days after 10 of its journalists were gunned down in Paris by Muslim extremists. Those protests have turned violent in Algeria, Pakistan and Niger, where at least two Christian churches were set fire.

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Sat January 17, 2015

Gunmen Kidnap Top Official In Yemen

The undated portrait photo shows Ahmed Awad bin Mubarak, chief of staff for Yemeni President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. Bin Mubarak was kidnapped on Saturday in Sanaa.
Xinhua Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 4:21 pm

Gunmen in Yemen have abducted President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi's chief of staff from his vehicle in the center of the capital, Sanaa, according to security officials who blame Shiite Houthi rebels for the kidnapping.

Ahmed Awad bin Mubarak and two of his body guards were seized early Saturday, officials say. The Associated Press quotes unnamed officials as saying the three were kidnapped when they stopped their car in the capital. No ransom demand has been made and so far no one has claimed responsibility.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Sat January 17, 2015

Storm Causes Pope To Cut Short Visit To Typhoon Hit Tacloban

Wearing a yellow raincoat, Pope Francis gives a thumbs up to the faithful as he arrives in Tacloban, Philippines, on Saturday.
Wally Santana AP

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 6:10 pm

A storm forced Pope Francis to cut short a visit to the Philippine city of Tacloban, where Typhoon Haiyan made a devastating landfall in 2013, killing at least 6,300 people in the predominately Catholic country.

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The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

WATCH: SpaceX Booster Crashes On Barge

An image provided by SpaceX showing the barge that was used in an unsuccessful attempt to recover the Falcon 9 first stage.
AP

As we reported last week, the latest SpaceX resupply mission successfully lifted off from Cape Canaveral and later made a rendezvous with the International Space Station. But a secondary goal of the flight -– to test landing a spent booster from the Falcon 9 rocket on a floating platform — didn't go as well.

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The Two-Way
3:52 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

Chinese Spy Chief Latest Snared In Anti-Corruption Campaign

One of China's top spymasters has reportedly been retained after apparently running afoul of President Xi Jinping's aggressive anti-corruption drive.

Beijing confirmed that Ma Jian, vice-minister in the Ministry of State Security, is being investigated on suspicion of "serious violations" of the law, according to the BBC, which says: "No further details were given in the one-line statement on the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection's website, but the wording used typically applies to a corruption probe."

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The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

Archdiocese Of St. Paul-Minneapolis Files Chapter 11

St. Paul-Minneapolis Archbishop John Nienstedt speaks at his office in St. Paul, Minn., in a photo taken in July. Nienstedt announced Friday that the archdiocese was filing for bankruptcy following more than a dozen claims from alleged sexual abuse victims.
Craig Lassig AP

The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis has become the 12th U.S. diocese forced into bankruptcy by claims from alleged victims of clergy sexual abuse.

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The Two-Way
10:58 am
Fri January 16, 2015

Arizona 1st In Nation To Require High Schoolers To Pass Civics Test

A new U.S. citizen holds an American flag during a naturalization ceremony in July. An Arizona law will require graduating high school seniors to pass the same civics test given to candidates for U.S. citizenship.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 11:18 am

What year was the Constitution written?

Who was president during World War I?

If you couldn't answer one or both of the above, you might not be able to pass a civics test given to candidates for U.S. citizenship. Or (starting in 2017) graduate from high school in Arizona.

On Thursday, Gov. Doug Ducey signed a bill making a high school diploma in the state contingent upon students passing the same test given to candidates for U.S. citizenship. The class of 2017 will be the first to have the new requirement.

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The Two-Way
9:38 am
Fri January 16, 2015

Pope, On Visit To Philippines, Defends Catholic Ban On Contraception

Pope Francis holds a Virgin Mary statue as he arrives at the Mall of Asia arena in Manila, Philippines, on Friday. The pontiff has issued a strong statement supporting the church's teachings on artificial contraception.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 11:01 am

Speaking to one of Asia's fastest-growing populations, Pope Francis issued what is being described as his strongest defense yet of the Catholic Church's opposition to artificial contraception, urging that Philippine families be "sanctuaries of respect for life."

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The Two-Way
4:57 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

Sri Lanka's Transition Of Power Maybe Not So Peaceful After All

Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa after casting his ballot in last week's election. The new government says that contrary to reports of a peaceful transition when Rajapaksa lost, the long-time leader tried to stay in power by force.
Pradeep Dilruckshana AP

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 5:02 pm

When we brought you the news last week that Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa had been defeated in a nationwide elections, reports were that Asia's longest serving leader willingly handed over the reins to his rival.

Rajapaksa, who had ruled since 2005, even tweeted that he looked forward to a "peaceful transition of power" to erstwhile ally Maithripala Sirisena, who won by just under 4 percent of the vote.

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The Two-Way
3:32 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

Indian Man, A No-Show At Work For 25 Years, Finally Gets The Ax

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 8:54 am

One day in 1990, A.K. Verma went on what you might call "extended" leave from his job as a senior bureaucrat at India's Central Public Works Department.

He's been a no-show ever since. And it finally caught up to him: Verma was sacked for his absence — on Jan. 8.

Blame (or credit) India's tough labor laws: They are some of the most pro-worker in the world and make it nearly impossible for employers, including state and local governments, to fire for anything short of criminal misconduct.

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