Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

It's one vacation selfie that Joseph and Travis Dasilva won't soon forget.

The American couple, who The Los Angeles Times describes as "minor Instagram celebrities from San Diego," snapped a photo of their exposed buttocks at Bangkok's Wat Arun, or "Temple of Dawn," one of the country's most popular tourist landmarks.

Kim Jong Nam, the murdered half-brother of North Korea's leader, was carrying an antidote to the nerve agent that killed him when he was attacked in February in Kuala Lumpur's international airport.

Japan's 83-year-old Emperor Akihito will abdicate on April 30, 2019, capping a three-decade reign on the Chrysanthemum Throne, the Imperial Household Council said Friday – setting a date to the desire first hinted at by the monarch more than a year ago.

The abdication, the first in some 200 years in Japan, will usher in a new era to replace the current Heisei era that began with Akihito's ascendency.

Updated at 6:25 a.m. ET

Two former naval officers were among 29 people given life sentences Wednesday in Argentina for their involvement in human rights abuses carried out during the country's "Dirty War," a brutal period of military dictatorship from 1976-1983.

Former Capts. Alfredo Astiz, known as the "Angel of Death," and Jorge Eduardo Acosta, aka "The Tiger," were given life sentences in the largest and longest trial of its kind in Argentina's history. It opened in 2012 and focused on crimes against 789 victims at the Naval Mechanics School, or ESMA, which was turned into a secret torture center.

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