Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

Update at 5:45 p.m. ET 24 Governors Now Oppose Resettlement:

In the wake of Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris, a growing number of Republican U.S. governors say they oppose allowing refugees from Syria to settle within their states.

Japan has once again slipped back into recession, casting new doubts upon whether "Abenomics," its much-touted economic-reform agenda, is succeeding.

The economy contracted by .8 percent in the third quarter of 2015, following a decline of .7 percent in the preceding quarter.

It was the fourth time in five years that the Japanese economy entered a recession, which is usually defined as two successive quarters of negative growth.

The government said consumption by the private sector rose by .5 percent during the quarter, in line with expectations.

Twenty years after Serbs massacred 8,000 Muslim men and boys in the Bosnian town of Srebrenica, the Serb government says it is donating $5.4 million to help revive the town's economy.

"We want Srebrenica to become a bridge of cooperation," said Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic, attending an investment conference in the town.

A federal grand jury in New York has indicted two nephews of Venezuela's powerful first lady for allegedly trying to smuggle cocaine into the United States.

Efrain Antonio Campo Flores, 29, and Franqui Francisco Flores de Freitas, 30, were charged in a one-count indictment filed in New York. They will appear before a judge on Thursday afternoon.

A judge in Utah has ordered a lesbian couple to give up the infant foster child they were caring for, reportedly telling them that the girl would be better off living with a straight couple, according to The Salt Lake Tribune.

Beckie Peirce, 34, and her wife, April Hoagland, 38, say they were taken aback on Tuesday when 7th District Court Juvenile Judge Scott Johansen ordered the girl removed from their care and placed in another home within seven days.

Seven employees of a Florida real estate firm were among those who died when their small plane crashed into an Ohio apartment building Tuesday, the firm said today.

The plane, a 10-passenger Hawker business jet, was approaching Akron Fulton International Airport when it slammed into a four-unit apartment building at about 3:00 p.m., killing nine people including the crew.

Volkswagen is offering its diesel vehicle owners $1,000 in incentives, in what it calls "a first step" toward regaining their loyalty following the scandal over faked emissions tests.

The package is available to about 480,000 customers in the U.S. and Puerto Rico with 2-liter, four-cylinder diesel vehicles. They can apply to receive a $500 prepaid Visa card, a $500 dealership card and three years of free roadside assistance, the company said.

New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says coal giant Peabody Energy made false and misleading statements to investors about the financial risks it faces because of climate change.

As part of an agreement with Schneiderman's office, the company has agreed to revise the disclosures it makes to investors about the risks in its quarterly report released today, and has promised to include the disclosures in future filings.

Thousands of Russian tourists were returning home from Egypt on Sunday, as suspicions mount that a bomb may have caused the crash of a St. Petersburg-bound charter jet over the Sinai on Oct. 31.

"Today is the busiest day in this sense," Russian Deputy Prime Minister Arkady Dvorkovich said Sunday.

Russia announced Friday it was suspending flights to Egypt until it determined the cause of the crash, which killed 224 people.

The debate over the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the free-trade pact between the United States and 11 other countries, is about to heat up.