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5:06 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Secret Papers Reveal Islamic State's Structure

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
5:06 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Congressional Battle Brews Over Bill To Extend NSA Data Collection

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
5:06 am
Thu April 23, 2015

A Black Eye, A Middle Finger And Other Tales From A White House Press Secretary

Courtesy of Hachette Book Group

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 8:17 am

Being a White House press secretary sometimes requires taking a black eye or two for your boss, in this case, the president of the United States. Dana Perino learned that lesson the hard way. She was White House press secretary at the end of President George W. Bush's second term, and she's out with a new book And The Good News Is... about her life and her time at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

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Around the Nation
4:25 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Oklahomans Feel Way More Earthquakes Than Californians; Now They Know Why

Austin Holland, research seismologist at the Oklahoma Geological Survey, gestures to a chart of Oklahoma earthquakes in June 2014 as he talks about recent earthquake activity at his offices at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. The state had three times as many earthquakes as California last year.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 9:28 am

A magnitude-3.0 earthquake is small, but most people can feel it. Historically, Oklahoma got less than two of those a year, but in 2013 it became two a week.

It's only gotten more active since then — last year, the state had three times as many earthquakes as in the entire seismically active state of California.

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The Salt
4:22 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Fruit Growers Try Tricking Mother Nature To Prevent Crop Damage

A cherry tree and its blossoms are covered with snow in an orchard near Traverse City, Mich. Three years ago, almost every fruit crop in Michigan was frozen out when cold temperatures followed some 80 degree days in March.
John L. Russell AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:41 am

Fruit growers in northern Michigan grow apples, peaches and wine grapes. But the big crop here is tart cherries.

More than half of Ken Engle's 140-acre farm is planted with what he calls sour cherries.

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U.S.
4:22 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Some Companies Fight Pay Gap By Eliminating Salary Negotiations

Women stage a protest demanding equal pay for women at a 2012 rally in Miami.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:41 am

When it comes to negotiating salaries, the research is pretty clear: women are less assertive than men. It's one reason women who start their careers with a narrower pay gap see it widen over time.

Carnegie Mellon economics professor Linda Babcock, who studies the gender pay gap, says men are four times more likely to negotiate their pay. That keeps women at a disadvantage, though they're not always aware of it.

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It's All Politics
7:06 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Visiting The Everglades, Obama Takes Swipe At Climate Change Deniers

"Part of the reason we're here is because climate change is threatening this treasure and the communities that depend on it," Obama said Wednesday of his visit to Everglades National Park in Florida. "If we don't act, there may not be an Everglades as we know it."
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

President Obama used the backdrop of the Florida Everglades this Earth Day to highlight the dangers posed by a changing climate. He also took a swipe at Florida's Republican governor, who's been accused of discouraging state workers from discussing global warming.

"Climate change can no longer be denied," Obama said. "It can't be edited out. It can't be omitted from the conversation. And action can no longer be delayed."

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The Salt
6:47 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower.
Albin Andersson/Nature

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

It's been about a decade since beekeepers and scientists began documenting a decline in honeybee populations and other important pollinators.

Even if you're not a lover of bees or honey, you should know that bees are critically important to our food supply. They help pollinate billions of dollars of crops each year, from apples and carrots to blueberries and almonds.

So if bees are threatened, ultimately, the production of these crops will be threatened, too.

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The Two-Way
6:06 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Court Throws Out Slugger Barry Bonds' Conviction

Former Major League Baseball player Barry Bonds. (March 21, 2011 file photo.)
Justin Sullivan Getty Images
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Parallels
5:59 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

9 Months' Pregnant, An African Woman Risks It All And Heads To Europe

Chantel, 3, and Antoni, 7 months, migrated to Spain from their native Cameroon, with their mother Tatiana Kanga, 25. Tatiana was nine months' pregnant with Antoni when they crossed the Mediterranean Sea together in an inflatable boat.
Lauren Frayer NPR

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 9:59 am

Tatiana Kanga was nine months' pregnant and had her 3-year-old daughter in tow when she set out from her native Cameroon, headed for Spain.

Kanga's journey took her and her young daughter, Chantel, across the continent northward to Morocco. From there, they crossed the Mediterranean Sea in a rubber dinghy.

"It was an inflatable boat, with 17 people," Kanga explains. "Seven of them were women, three children — and six of the women were pregnant, including me."

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