Shots - Health Blog
3:20 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Deadly 'Choking Game' Comes With Big Risks

Connor Galloway, age 12, was found dead in his bedroom with a belt looped around his neck. Connor's friends admitted to his mother that they'd been talking about playing "the choking game."
Courtesy of the Galloway family

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 8:48 am

Michele Galloway went looking for her son, Connor, one morning in their Webster, N.C., home to make sure the seventh-grader hadn't overslept.

"I opened the door and I found him," Galloway said. "And he looked like he was standing up beside his bed. And I just said, 'Connor, you're awake.' And then I realized he was not awake."

She looked more closely. "There was a little gap between his feet and the floor," she said. "And I realized, you know, he had a belt around his neck."

The other end of Connor's belt was looped around the top of his bunk bed.

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Around the Nation
3:19 am
Mon April 16, 2012

A Push To Help U.S. Veterans Fight Homelessness

Veteran James Brown relaxes in his apartment, which he recently moved into after spending decades on the streets.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 9:54 am

Last year, the number of homeless U.S. veterans on a given night dropped 12 percent from the year before. But tens of thousands were still on the streets, and more could be joining them as troops return from Afghanistan and Iraq. President Obama has vowed to end veterans' homelessness by 2015.

Homeless No More

James Brown left the Army in 1979. And for most of the next 32 years, he lived on the streets in and around Los Angeles. You might have seen him: the dirty, disheveled guy trying to keep warm in a cardboard box.

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The Two-Way
3:18 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Americans Do Not Walk The Walk, And That's A Growing Problem

Americans walk less than the citizens of any other industrialized nation, says Tom Vanderbilt. In this file photo from last summer, pedestrians and a cyclist cross the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

"Americans now walk the least of any industrialized nation in the world," says writer Tom Vanderbilt. To find out why that is, Vanderbilt has been exploring how towns are built, how Americans view walking — and what might be done to get them moving around on their own two feet.

Talking with Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep about what is wrong with Americans' relationship with walking, Vanderbilt says, "The main thing is, we're just not doing enough of it."

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Shots - Health Blog
3:17 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Why Women Suffer More Migraines Than Men

A vintage ad for a headache remedy plays to women.
The National Library of Medicine

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 8:52 am

One in four women has had a migraine. And, it turns out, the debilitating headaches affect three times more women than men.

But why?

Decades ago, these headaches were attributed to women's inability to cope with stress, a sort of hysteria. Now experts are starting to figure out the factors that really make a difference.

Today scientists know a migraine is all in your head — but not in that old-fashioned sense. Migraines are biologically based, and they play themselves out as a wave of electrical activity traveling across the brain.

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Programming
10:00 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

Morning Edition Monday, April 16th: Tax Loopholes

NEA Wants Congress to Close Tax Loopholes

The President of the National Education Association, Dr. Dennis Van Roekling, talks about how easy it would be to solve the tax issue if legislators would just close corporate tax loopholes that allow many large corporations to avoid paying any taxes at all. He then talks about how just a few loopholes account for $3 Trillion in uncollected taxes which could be used for education, health care, job creation and to pay down debt. 

Programming
6:00 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

Today on Local Color

On Sunday's edition, our "Local Color...Live at Landslide" series resumes, with an interview/performance from Asheville performer Lyric. Courtesy Landslide Studio in Asheville.

Our Album Spotlight is from Asheville quintet, Sanctum Sully. We'll spin 3 tracks from their newest release, a bluegrassy affair, titled "Trade Winds."

Your Money
5:36 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

The Tax Man Cometh! But For Whom?

In the U.S., the top 10 percent of income earners pay 70 percent of all federal income taxes.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun April 15, 2012 9:30 pm

It's that time of year again – tax week.

With the deadline for Americans to file their income taxes looming, there's a good chance you've heard or will hear from politicians, on cable news and on talk radio about those who pay little or no taxes.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor has said that we "have a situation in this country where you're nearing 50 percent of people who don't even pay income taxes." There are even those who say that there are nearly 50 percent of Americans who pay no taxes at all.

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News
2:56 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

A Father And Son Go On Their Last 'Odyssey' Together

Author Daniel Mendelsohn, left, and his father, Jay, on the Odysseus-inspired cruise.
Andrea Wyner Travel + Leisure - April 2012

A few years ago, author, critic, and translator Daniel Mendelsohn was teaching the epic Greek poem The Odyssey when his father decided to take his class.

Jay Mendelsohn, a retired research scientist, wanted to understand his son better, and understand his life's work. When Daniel decided he wanted to retrace one of the most epic journeys of Greek literature, Jay became his travel partner.

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History
2:32 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

'Violins Of Hope': Instruments From The Holocaust

Amnon Weinstein prepares a violin from the Holocaust for exhibit. He began restoring the violins in 1996 and now has 30 of them to display in an exhibit called Violins of Hope.
Nancy Pierce

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:28 am

Amnon Weinstein first encountered a violin from the Holocaust 50 years ago. He was a young violin maker in Israel, and a customer brought him an old instrument in terrible condition and wanted it restored.

The customer had played on the violin on the way to the gas chamber, but he survived because the Germans needed him for their death camp orchestra. He hadn't played on it since.

"So I opened the violin, and there inside there [were] ashes," Weinstein says.

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

A Dispatch From The Titanic Memorial Cruise

Laurie and Dan Castaneda from Long Beach, Calif., walk the pool deck of the Azamara Journey on a Titanic Memorial Cruise. Preparation for their costumes involved several weeks of research, last-minute purchases and even home-sewn clothing from vintage patterns.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 9:05 am

One hundred years ago this Sunday, the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank into the Atlantic on its maiden voyage. At that very spot today is another luxury liner, there to mark the centennial of the disaster. Writer Lester Reingold is on board the memorial cruise, and he sends us this report.

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