NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
5:22 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Parks Vie For Space In Miami's Forest Of Condos

The skyline of the northern Brickell neighborhood in downtown Miami. Its residential population has more than doubled in the past decade.
Marc Averette Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 8:52 pm

Many cities around the nation are trying to revive their downtowns, adding more apartments and condominiums — usually high-rises — to lure new residents.

But as urban dwellers grow in numbers, they need places to get outside. Yet, in many cities, like Miami, neighborhood parks can be hard to find. The Trust for Public Land ranks Miami 94 on a list of 100 cities when it comes to park acreage per 1,000 residents — just 2.8 acres per 1,000 residents, versus 4.5 in New York and 6.2 in Los Angeles.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:56 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Why Does Pregnancy Last 9 Months?

How much longer could Junior really stay in there?
Olivier Lantzendorffer iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 9:42 am

Babies are lovely but altogether helpless creatures.

Wouldn't it be better if tiny humans were born able to walk, like horses, or generally were readier for the rigors of the world, like, say, chimps?

Among primates, human have the least developed brains at birth, at least when compared to adult human brains. If humans were born as far along on cognitive and neurological scales as rough and ready chimps are, though, human pregnancy would have to last at least twice as long. Eighteen months in the womb, anyone?

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It's All Politics
4:55 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Delegate Views Don't Always Reflect Party As A Whole

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 5:57 pm

Ever wondered whether convention delegates hold political views that are more extreme than most members of their own parties? You could ask them.

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The Two-Way
4:43 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Malcolm Browne, Journalist Who Took The 'Burning Monk' Photo, Dies

Journalist Malcome Browne took this iconic photo of the self-immolation of Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc in Saigon in 1963. The monk committed suicide to protest what he called government persecution of Buddhists. Browne, who worked for the AP and later The New York Times, died Monday at age 81.
Malcom Browne AP

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 10:36 pm

Malcolm Browne was a first-rate reporter who spent decades at The New York Times, covered wars around the world and won the Pulitzer Prize for his writing about the early days of the Vietnam war.

And yet he will forever be remembered for one famous picture, the 1963 photo of a Buddhist monk who calmly set himself on fire on the streets of Saigon to protest against the South Vietnamese government, which was being supported by the U.S.

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The Two-Way
3:40 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Colombian President Says 'Exploratory Talks' Held With FARC Rebels

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos delivering a speech to the nation at Narino Palace in Bogota.
Cesar Carrion AFP/Getty Images

The president of Colombia admitted today that his government and the country's biggest rebel group have engaged in "exploratory talks." The public admission could set the stage for peace talks to end one of the world's longest armed conflicts.

From Bogota, NPR's Juan Forero filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"President Juan Manuel Santos, in a brief televised address, said talks had taken place with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.

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Participation Nation
3:34 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Home Away From Home In Bismarck, N.D.

Tracy's Sanctuary House
Courtesy of TSH

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 10:00 pm

In August 2004, Tracy Rittel was in a fatal car accident near Fargo. While Tracy battled for her life, her family had trouble finding a place to stay near the hospital.

From that experience, the Rittels created Tracy's Sanctuary House in Bismarck for families who find themselves in a similar situation. Since 2005, some 1,500 families have used the home.

A dozen volunteers "put their hearts and souls into making sure the house is kept up," says Tracy's daughter Kelsey Zottnick.

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World Cafe
2:05 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Diamond Rugs On World Cafe

Diamond Rugs.
Amie Ledford

Muddying the waters separating indie rock, country and Southern blues, Diamond Rugs formed in Nashville as an all-star music collective assembled by John McCauley of Deer Tick.

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It's All Politics
1:52 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

As It Happened: GOP Kicks Off Its Convention; Makes Its Case To The Nation

Texas delegates cheer as Romney is formally nominated as the Republican Party's presidential candidate.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 1:23 am

  • NPR Special Coverage, Hour 1
  • NPR Special Coverage, Hour 2
  • NPR Special Coverage, Hour 3

With a program designed both to tell the American people more about Mitt Romney and to make the case that Republicans' ideas for solving the nation's problems are better than Democrats', the 2012 GOP National Convention got going today and Romney officially became the party's presidential nominee.

Delegates also officially made Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin the party's vice presidential nominee.

We live blogged through the afternoon and evening. Scroll down and read "up" if you want to see how the story developed.

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The Picture Show
1:51 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Drinking, Dancing, Dolly Parton: Photos Of The '70s Country Music Scene

Last Call, Tootsie's Orchid Lounge, Nashville, Tenn., 1974
Henry Horenstein

It may come as a surprise that the photographer who shot these country stars — and their fans — is from Massachusetts. But, Henry Horenstein explains, country music "was a rural music, not necessarily a Southern music."

As a young photographer, Horenstein spent a good part of the 1970s and early '80s at bluegrass festivals, Nashville's Grand Ole Opry, New England honky-tonks and elsewhere, documenting what he believed was an "era that was going to go away."

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The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

How Much Rain Will Hurricane Isaac Dump? Have A Look At This Map

Rainfall prediction from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
NOAA

The story of Hurricane Isaac will more than likely be one of flooding. The National Hurricane Center says that some places along the Mississippi and Louisiana coast could see up to 18 inches of rain.

Over five days, the tropical system will spread rain far and wide.

How widespread, you ask? Look at this map put together by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It shows their prediction of how much rain will fall in the next five days:

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