Peak of the Week
10:05 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Thursday Night the 9th between 8pm & Midnight: SHINYRIBS - Gulf Coast Museum

The Gourds' frontman Kev Russell has had a side project for a few years now, to help provide an outlet for his huge well of material.  But to throw in a little curveball, he ends Gulf Coast Museum with a ukulele version of "If You Don't Know Me By Now".  Featuring a revolving lineup of Austin talent backing him up, this is Shinyribs' second album ("Poor Peoples' Store" became a WNCW hit from their first.) 

The Two-Way
5:49 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Huge Solar Plane Begins Slow Flight Across The U.S.

Pilot Bertrand Piccard takes off in the Solar Impulse solar electric airplane at Moffett Field in Mountain View, California, on Friday.
Beck Diefenbach Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 6:43 am

The Solar Impulse, a solar-powered airplane with the 208-foot wing-span, has begun a slow journey across the United States.

We've told you about the Swiss plane before. A year ago, the plane took 20 hours to fly from Switzerland to Spain and then flew to Morocco completing its first transcontinental flight.

Read more
Code Switch
5:31 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

A Black Jockey At The Kentucky Derby, Once Again

Kevin Krigger rides Goldencents during a six-furlong workout at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif., in January.
Benoit Photo AP

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 6:41 am

The Kentucky Derby's 139th running is this weekend, and it will feature a sight that's been a rarity in the race for much of the past century — an African-American jockey.

"Everything that comes with the Derby right now for me is not the same as the majority of the other riders, or any other riders, because I'm the only African-American rider in the race," Kevin Krigger says.

Krigger was born in the U.S. Virgin Islands, but he's been racing in California. He's the first African-American jockey to ride in the Derby in more than a decade.

Read more
Code Switch
5:18 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Bollywood's Early Roots In A Silent Film

Dhundiraj Govind Phalke (left), known as the father of Indian cinema, examines a filmstrip.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 10:35 am

Film festivals around the world are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Indian films this year.

Bollywood today is well known for its over-the-top song-and-dance numbers. (Case in point: In the 1998 Hindi film Dil Se, a troupe of dancers gyrate in unison to a love song on top of a moving train.)

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:32 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

From Battlefield To Boston: Marine Comforts Bombing Survivors

Marine Sgt. Maj. Damion Jacobs (left) and Marine Capt. Cam West visit with Boston emergency workers who responded to the bombings at the Boston Marathon.
Oren Dorell for USA Today

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 1:17 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
4:28 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Dow Hits 15,000 For The First Time; Closes Just Shy Of The Mark

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange after the morning bell on May 1.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 4:55 pm

The stock market continues its winning streak: The Dow Jones hit another milestone today, tapping 15,000 for the first time, but closing just shy of the milestone.

This, of course, follows good news about the job market released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Read more
The Salt
4:19 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Unraveling The Mystery Of A Rice Revolution

Rice farmers in Indonesia plant rice seedlings using the "system of rice intensification."
Courtesy of SRI International Network and Resources Center

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 5:02 pm

It's a captivating story: A global rice-growing revolution that started with a Jesuit priest in Madagascar, far from any recognized center of agricultural innovation. Every so often, it surfaces in the popular media — most recently in The Guardian, which earlier this year described farmers in one corner of India hauling in gigantic rice harvests without resorting to pesticides or genetic modification.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:06 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Falling In Love Again: Face-Transplant Donor's Daughter Meets Recipient

Carmen Blandin Tarleton of Thetford, Vermont, right, is embraced by Marinda Righter, daughter of face donor Cheryl Denelli-Righter, at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass., on Wednesday.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 8:28 pm

If there's one conversation you listen to today, make it Melissa Block's talk with Carmen Blandin Tarleton and Marinda Righter.

Tarleton, who was disfigured when her estranged husband poured Lye over her body, received a face transplant in February. This week, for the first time, Tarleton met Righter, the daughter of the face donor.

Righter and Tarleton embraced and then Righter asked Tarleton if she could touch her face.

"It was probably one of the best feelings I've had in my life," Tarleton told Melissa.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:04 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

U.S. Revises Entry Procedure For Those On Student Visas

The department of Homeland Security is changing the way border agents process those people entering the country on student visas.

"Effective immediately," the AP reports, agents will have to "verify that every international student who arrives in the U.S. has a valid student visa."

The AP adds:

Read more
NPR News Investigations
4:03 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Justice In The Segregated South: A New Look At An Old Killing

When John Queen died in August 1965 in front of the Ice House (the building between the Standard Oil station and The Dollar Store), rules of racial inferiority were so entrenched in Fayette, Miss., that black residents felt they couldn't complain. But just four months later things changed and black residents marched on Dec. 24 as part of their boycott against white-owned businesses.
Jack Thornell AP

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 6:41 am

This story contains language that some may find offensive.

In the segregated South in 1965, John Queen was about as insignificant as a man could be. He was black, elderly and paralyzed. His legs had been crushed when as a boy he fell off a roof. For the rest of his life, he pulled himself around with his hands.

In Fayette, Miss., he would shine shoes on Main Street for a few coins. People called him "Crippled Johnny" or "Shoe-Shine Johnny."

Read more

Pages