NPR Ed
8:03 am
Tue July 22, 2014

In This School, Class Is A Workshop And Experiments Are Mandatory

Haziz Self says that he's learned "what it means to live up to your principles."
Kimberly Paynter WHYY

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:33 pm

Imagine a school where classes are organized not by subject but by project — a school created not by administrators, but by teachers fed up with the status quo. A school where kids from a city's toughest neighborhoods are given the opportunity to experiment and the freedom to fail.

In West Philadelphia, that school is a reality. It's called The Workshop School.

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The Two-Way
7:57 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Jakarta Gov. Widodo Wins Indonesian Presidency, Tally Shows

Indonesian presidential candidate Joko Widodo talks to the media during his visit at a reservoir development project in Jakarta on Tuesday.
Dita Alangkara AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:13 pm

Jakarta Gov. Joko Widodo won 53 percent of the vote in Indonesia's presidential election, according to a final tally released Tuesday by the country's Election Commission.

Widodo, a former furniture maker who entered national politics only two years ago, received 70,997,859 votes of the nearly 133 million valid ballots cast; his rival former Gen. Prabowo Subianto, received 46.85 percent of the votes. Turnout was high — nearly 71 percent.

The figures were reported by The Associated Press.

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Strange News
6:53 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Sheriff Puts Inmates Back In Stripes As Orange Jumpsuits Gain Fame

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A sheriff in Michigan is concerned that the popular series "Orange Is The New Black" has turned orange prison jumpsuits into a fashion statement, like it's cool to be in jail. So concerned, he's requiring inmates to wear old-fashioned black-and-white-striped jumpsuits in place of the orange ones. Sheriff Will Federspiel told The Saginaw News that a lot of inmates don't like the new jumpsuits. His response - too bad, don't come to jail. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:53 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Train Carrying MH17 Victims' Remains Arrives In Government-Controlled City

Police officers secure a refrigerated train loaded with bodies of the passengers of Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 as it arrives in a Kharkiv factory on Tuesday.
Olga Ivashchenko AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 9:03 am

A refrigerated train carrying the remains of the people who died aboard the downed Malaysia Airlines plane arrived in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Tuesday. That's a city controlled by the central government in Kiev and 17 hours away from the chaos of Hrabove, the eastern city controlled by pro-Russian separatists, where the debris and remains were scattered.

The New York Times sets the scene:

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NPR Story
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Telecommuting Didn't Work Out For One Transplanted Worker

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This summer, we're also focusing on the high rate of youth unemployment and hearing what some out-of-work younger adults are doing to make ends meet. Christina Gastlelum is 32. She recently moved to Maine from New York City. She tried to keep doing her job as vice president of a nonprofit remotely which did not work out.

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Sports
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Woman Will Officiate Big 12 Football Game For The First Time

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to Catherine Conti. Cat Conti will be the first woman to officiate a football game in the Big 12 Conference. She'll be part of the crew when Kansas plays Southeast Missouri State. The officiating supervisor says she got that job because she's, quote, "darned good." Kansas coach Charlie Weis says because of Ms. Conti, he will try not to swear as much.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Actually, Coach Weis, equality means curse away.

Shots - Health News
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Teens Say Looks Can Be Liberating Despite Fashion Police

Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:43 pm

At Oakland Tech, like high schools all over, passing period is a time for passing judgments.

Aaliyah Douglass, a 17-year-old, gives me a taste of how harsh critiques can be at the school in Oakland, Calif. She starts by evaluating a male classmate who walks by wearing shorts, a T-shirt and Vans.

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Goats and Soda
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten

Sylvester Jusu is a volunteer who works with the Red Cross burial team in Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:34 pm

Saidu Kanneh was given a hero's welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.

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National Security
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Before Snowden: The Whistleblowers Who Tried To Lift The Veil

Over the last dozen years, whistleblowers at the National Security Agency have had a rough track record, facing FBI raids and lawsuits.
NSA Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Bill Binney worked at the National Security Agency nearly three decades as one of its leading crypto-mathematicians. He then became one of its leading whistleblowers.

Now 70 and on crutches, both legs lost to diabetes, Binney recalls the July morning seven years ago when a dozen gun-wielding FBI agents burst through the front door of his home, at the end of a cul-de-sac a 10-minute drive from NSA headquarters in Fort Meade, Md.

"I first knew that they were in there when they were pointing a gun at me as I was coming out of the shower," Binney says.

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The Two-Way
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Rubio: U.S. Cannot Admit All Children Seeking Asylum

Rubio, seen here addressing the National Press Club in May, told NPR he'll decide on a presidential run in the next few months
Alex Wong Getty

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:24 pm

Sen. Marco Rubio argued that the nation's immigration laws need to be overhauled and said that Hillary Clinton would be a flawed candidate for president.

"I just think she's a 20th century candidate," he said. "I think she does not offer an agenda for moving America forward in the 21st century, at least not up till now."

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