The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Typhoon Lashes China, Adding To Flood Woes

Huge typhoon-driven waves surge up the coastline of Huangqi Peninsula in China's eastern Fujian province on Saturday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds of thousands of people in southeast China have been evacuated after a powerful typhoon barreled into the region, packing strong winds and heavy rain.

Typhoon Soulik made landfall in China's Fujian province Saturday afternoon after sweeping across Taiwan.

The typhoon comes as China is already battling torrential rainfall across large parts of the country, especially in Sichuan province. Some 200 people have been killed in floods, the worst in some areas of Sichuan in 50 years.

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The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Sun July 14, 2013

Civil Rights Groups Call Zimmerman Verdict A 'Miscarriage'

Supporters of Treyvon Martin wait in front of the Seminole County Criminal Justice Center before the not-guilty verdict was announced in the George Zimmerman murder trial on Saturday in Sanford, Fla. Now, the NAACP and other groups are calling for the Department of Justice to bring a civil rights case against George Zimmerman.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 3:48 pm

Civil rights groups reacted with disappointment to the not-guilty verdict in the George Zimmerman murder trial.

After the outcome became known late Saturday, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund said it would push for the Department of Justice to bring civil rights charges against Zimmerman, who was accused in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old black youth Trayvon Martin.

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Zimmerman's Brother: Race 'Wasn't An Element In This Case'

Robert Zimmerman Jr. (left) speaking with defense attorney Mark O'Mara during a pre-trial hearing in May.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 12:12 pm

George Zimmerman's brother, Robert Zimmerman, Jr., tells NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday that despite the acquittal in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, it will be a "long time" before his brother's life returns to normal.

"Believe me, he is overwhelmed," the elder brother said in an interview with host Rachel Martin. "And now it is time for him to readjust to that concept of being a free man, in every sense of the word."

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The Two-Way
9:04 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Sifting Through Emotions After Tense Zimmerman Trial

Zimmerman didn't talk to the media after his exoneration, but his lead lawyer said they were "ecstatic with the results."
AP

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 11:49 pm

Months of intense media coverage, weeks of courtroom testimony and hours of jury deliberations boiled down to a not-guilty verdict for George Zimmerman, delivered by a jury of six women late Saturday.

The decision came 17 months after Zimmerman, a self-styled volunteer watchman, fatally shot unarmed black teen Trayvon Martin during a confrontation in a Sanford, Fla., community.

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World
8:34 am
Sun July 14, 2013

British TV Broadcasts Muslim Call To Prayer

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 12:12 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The holy month of Ramadan began this past week, a time when Muslims around the world engage in a disciplined routine of fasting and prayer.

(SOUNDBITE OF CALL TO PRAYER)

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Parallels
5:22 am
Sun July 14, 2013

The Don Who's Taken Charge Of Jordan's Biggest Refugee Camp

Mohammed al Hariri is known as the mafia don of the Zaatari Refugee camp. He is the man who gets things done.
Peter Breslow/NPR

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 11:14 pm

In chaotic situations, certain people rise to the top, and that is certainly the case for Mohammed al-Hariri, a former air conditioning repairman who commands enormous deference on the windblown streets of Zaatari refugee camp.

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Code Switch
4:00 am
Sun July 14, 2013

With Fla. Verdict, Is Protective Clothing Still Required?

Many families live in dread of standing in the shoes of Trayvon Martin's parents. His mother, Sybrina Fulton (second from left) and father, Tracy Martin, were in court Friday as a Florida jury began its deliberations.
Gary W. Green AP

"I'm ashamed at how long it took me to realize why so many people in my family have been consumed with looking church-ready when they step out the door regardless of time or day."

That Facebook quote came from Phyllis Fletcher, an African-American colleague at KUOW in Seattle. And it reminded me of something my sister once told me when a white friend teased her about taking too long to get ready when they went on joint shopping expeditions. "Why are you getting all dressed up? Just throw on some jeans, like me, and let's go."

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The Sunday Conversation
4:00 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Patrolling Border, Sheriff Sees Immigrants' 'Determination'

Tony Estrada is the sheriff of Santa Cruz County, Ariz.
Courtesy of Tony Estrada

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Tony Estrada is the sheriff of Santa Cruz County, Ariz., the poorest of all the border counties in the U.S. There are more than 1,000 Border Patrol Agents stationed in the county, which shares some 50 miles of border with Mexico.

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Parallels
3:48 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Russia Keeps Up Prosecutions Of Critics, Living And Dead

Sergei Magnitsky, who died in jail in 2009, was convicted of tax evasion on July 11, 2013. Kremlin critics say this was just the strangest of several legal cases against government opponents.
Misha Japaridze AP

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 12:09 pm

A Russian court's conviction of a dead man, Sergei Magnitsky, made headlines this past week because the case was so bizarre.

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Business
3:27 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Baggage Fees Turn Five Years Old; Passengers Turn Blase

A traveler collects his bag from a luggage carousel in the Philadelphia International Airport in 2011. Baggage fees have helped financially desperate carriers stay aloft.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 12:41 pm

Hey, baggage fees — happy fifth birthday!

Even if passengers aren't eager to celebrate, airlines are. The fees, born in 2008, helped financially desperate carriers stay aloft as the U.S. economy was spiraling down.

"That was a watershed year that scared the bejeezus out of the airline industry," said Mark Gerchick, an aviation consultant who has just released a book, Full Upright and Locked Position. Even as ticket sales were sliding, jet fuel prices were shooting to historic highs.

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