Spindale Cycle
11:25 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

Monday, October 8th at 8pm: SHAWN COLVIN - Steady On

To celebrate WNCW's birthday this week, we look back at a classic album from our first year, 1989.  It was the year of Shawn Colvin's debut, "Steady On", featuring Suzanne Vega, Bruce Hornsby, and above all, the introduction of the impressive songwriting and studio partnership between Colvin and longtime collaborator John Leventhal.  Join us for a release that was a cornerstone of our first year of programming! 

Peak of the Week
11:24 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

Thursday, October 11th, 8pm-12am: TIM O'BRIEN & DARRELL SCOTT - We're Usually a Lot Better Than This

Recorded at shows in 2005 and 2006 at The Grey Eagle in Asheville, this live collection shows the friendship and collaborative spirit of two of WNCW's favorite modern Americana songwriters.  You can also hear the warmth and passion of the cause that these shows were about: fundraisers for the Arthur Morgan School in Celo, where they each had a child enrolled.  Don't let the name of this fool you -- it's outstanding! 

It's All Politics
7:33 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

Big Bird Makes A Campaign Appearance

A protester dressed as "Big Bird" outside a Mitt Romney rally Friday in Abingdon, Va.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

For those concerned that Americans weren't paying close enough attention to the presidential election, a tall, fluffy, yellow bird helped change that this week.

Two days after the presidential debate in which Mitt Romney brought up the Sesame Street character in a reference to federal funding for PBS, the "Save Big Bird" debate continued.

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Shots - Health Blog
6:33 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

Meningitis Outbreak Update: List Of Hospitals Released

The government has named 75 medical facilities that received a potentially contaminated drug suspected of infecting 47 patients with meningitis nationwide.

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The Two-Way
6:12 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

Officials Investigating Whether Border Patrol Was Killed By Friendly Fire

U.S. Border Patrol agent Nicholas J. Ivie.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 8:28 pm

The shooting death of a Border Patrol agent along the Arizona-Mexico border may have been the result of friendly fire. The FBI said a preliminary investigation indicates the death of one agent and the injury of another "were the result of an accidental shooting incident involving only the agents."

NPR's Ted Robbins tells our Newscast unit the FBI was investigating the possibility of friendly fire and that today Homeland Security Janet Napolitano flew to Arizona to review the case and meet with the dead agent's family.

He filed this report from Bisbee, Ariz.:

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Shots - Health Blog
5:27 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

Arabian Coronavirus: Plot Thickens But Virus Lies Low

Different types of coronaviruses can cause a simple cold or a deadly respiratory illness, such as SARS.
BSIP UIG via Getty Images

It now appears that the new coronavirus found on the Arabian Peninsula is more widespread than initially thought, even though only two people are known to have gotten sick from it.

At first it seemed likely that the two known cases of illness from the new cousin-of-SARS virus may have been exposed in or near the Saudi Arabian city of Jeddah on the Red Sea coast.

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The Two-Way
5:03 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

U.S. Speedskating Launches Disciplinary Panel For Skate Tampering Incident

Simon Cho of the U.S. celebrates during the 500 meter men's final race at the Short Track Speed Skating World Cup in Dresden in 2011.
Jens Meyer AP

U.S. Speedskating apologized today, after one of its athletes admitted that he tampered with the skates of a competitor.

"I speak for everyone at U.S. Speedskating — our staff, athletes and Board of Directors — when I say that we are shocked and disappointed by Simon [Cho's] actions," Tamara Castellano, marketing director of U.S. Speedskating, said in a prepared statement. "We would like to apologize to Speedskate Canada and Olivier Jean, as well as all of the Canadian athletes who competed in Warsaw, for the actions of our athlete."

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Africa
4:37 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

Benghazi Attack Raises New Questions About Al-Qaida

U.S. authorities are investigating whether al-Qaida played a role in last month's attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi. Here, a damaged vehicle sits outside the consulate one day after the attack.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 11:07 pm

For the past decade, al-Qaida has been a top-down organization.

Letters seized at Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan showed that he was a hands-on manager, approving everything from operations to leadership changes in affiliate groups.

But there's early intelligence that al-Qaida may have had a small role in the attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, which killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, on Sept. 11.

If al-Qaida involvement is confirmed, it may signal that al-Qaida has changed.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:25 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

After Ebola Fades, What Happens To The Quarantined?

After testing negative for Ebola, Magdalena Nyamurungi returns home with a new set of belongings from the World Health Organization. Medical workers burned and buried her possessions when they suspected she was infected.
B. Sensasi Courtesy of WHO

The Ebola outbreak in Uganda, which started two months ago, has come to a close.

"The Ministry of Health [of Uganda] has been very prudent of declaring the outbreak over," Gregory Hartl, a World Health Organization spokesman, tells Shots. The last case was detected over 42 days ago — or twice the incubation period for the hemorrhagic fever — so new infections are highly unlikely.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:25 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

Your Verdict On Getting A Genome Test? Bring It On

Each strand of DNA is written in a simple language composed of four letters: A, T, C and G.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 5:24 pm

The news that the cost of personal genome sequencing will soon drop as low as $1,000 has generated a quite a bit of interest and concern — from medical researchers, biotech companies, bioethicists and the average consumer alike.

NPR's Rob Stein explored many of the implications of this technology in his four-part series "The $1,000 Genome." They're complicated, to say the least.

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